dior fall 2018 show

Every Detail You May Have Missed from Dior's Fall 2018 Show

Inspired by 1960s rebellion, Maria Grazia Chiuri used the runway to make a statement.

By: Samantha Tse
Photography: Molly SJ Lowe

Female empowerment has always been central to Maria Grazia Chiuri’s collections for Christian Dior, and now, in her fourth season with the storied French brand, the Italian-born designer continues to use the runway as a platform for feminism.

This season, Chiuri drew from the 1968 protest in Paris, when students and nine million strikers fought against antiquated ideologies about women, class, and politics. The protest fought for change—something that still resonates now, especially as the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements gain momentum.

Models walked down a set completely collaged with posters, women’s magazine tear sheets from 1968, and feminist slogans including “Women’s rights are human rights.” Ruth Bell opened the show with a slogan knit stating, “C’est non, non, non et non,” setting the tone for strength and rebellion. Gone are Chiuri’s sheer romantic ballerina-length dresses and branded kitten heels; in their place were kilts in varying lengths with matching jackets, ponchos, long tulle skirts with lace detailing worn with masculine wool jackets, and heavily embroidered maxi-dresses. Footwear was strong and practical: thigh-high boots with stacked heels and clogs—perfect for stomping through the streets of Paris with the brand’s iconic saddle bags in tow. Patchwork was seen on jackets, dresses, and mini-skirts paired with buttery leather moto jackets. Denim, a traditionally working-class fabric and a favorite of Chiuri’s, came in various guises from patchwork coats to cropped pants with embroidered detailing. Hemlines were noticeably shorter this season, and this gave nod to the 1966 protest outside the Dior boutique in Paris, when women held signs demanding “Mini Skirts Forever.”

All the models wore peak caps by Stephen Jones and oversized sunglasses. Makeup artist Peter Philips matched the liner with the eyewear using Diorshow On Stage Liner—a new series of brightly hued liners—while keeping the faces fresh and bare. Hairstylist Guido kept the hair smooth under the hats.

Check out the slideshow ahead for backstage photos and runway shots, as well as the inspirations behind hair and makeup.

Adwoa Aboah backstage before the show.

Peter Philips used Capture Youth Glow Booster under Diorskin Forever foundation to create luminosity.

“We went for beautiful skin—no contour, no blush, no highlights. I curled the lashes and enhanced the brows, and then we went for a blunt eyeliner that matched with the sunglasses she was going to wear,” said makeup artist Peter Philips.

The set, which featured over 3,000 protest posters and pages from women’s magazines from 1968, as well as feminist slogans.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“It’s not a precious wing, but just a blunt liner straight. It starts not quite at the beginning of the eye and goes until before the eye ends on the top and bottom, so it opens up the eye, but at the same time gives it a conceptual aspect,” said Philips.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Ruth Bell opened the show.

“The sixties were about personalities. It was the first time when mannequins became personalities. It was a tie of great goals, an inventive time… and these girls invented themselves.” —A quote from Diana Vreeland, which accompanied the show notes.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“Normally the designer sends a brief or a mood board, but I got a file with 20 sunglasses to inspire me for the show,” Philips said.

“I went to go see the sunglasses, and they were so cool, and Maria Grazia said every girl was going to wear sunglasses, and instead of working against that, I worked with it,” he said.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“Because the collection is about a manifestation and the May 1968 protests, I didn’t want to make it too pretty—so I made it cool, not precious,” explained Philips. “If you make it too girly, you lose the strength of your voice. By doing it conceptual, it becomes a bit stronger.”

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“It’s cool and pretty, and they’re ready to go say what they’re going to say,” Philips said of the makeup. “It also shows they can have fun and have a great time and enjoy being a woman and being great.”

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“Basically it’s about a rebellious girl, but she’s not rebellious enough to not blow her hair out. She’s kind of slightly bourgeois in her rebellion,” Guido said of his hair muse this season.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“You know, those girls who can be rebellious because they are bourgeois because they have a kind of ‘thing’ about them. It kind of nods to a late '60s, and the hair is very simple,” Guido said.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“The hair is very clean and easy,” said Guido.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“It’s slightly bourgeois hair but still being independent,” said Guido.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

“Girls with curls—we’re just leaving it that way, and the other girls we’re blow-drying the hair super simple with a middle part,” said Guido.

Christian Dior Fall 2018

Christian Dior Fall 2018

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