sweet saba
Career

Inside Instagram’s Favorite Candy Shop

Maayan Zilberman of Sweet Saba can turn Valentine’s candy into pure fashion.

Alec Kugler

When guests departed the Noon by Noor fall 2018 runway show this week, they left with sparkling edible feathers made out of hard candy and coated in gold glitter, inspired by details in the collection. At this point most people in fashion and beauty in New York, or fans of brands like Irene Neuwirth, W magazine, Delpozo, and Bergdorf Goodman (she’s sold in Linda Fargo’s shop inside the department store), would likely recognize the handiwork of Maayan Zilberman, the mastermind behind Sweet Saba. Her Instagram is packed with insanely cute (and delicious!) hard candies in fun shapes, painted in bright colors, that are basically begging to be a Valentine’s gift—and immediately Instagrammed. This year, she’s created heart-shaped shot glasses and floral cocktail rings.

“I’m able to make so much with my hands, and it makes people smile no matter who you are or where you’re from,” says Zilberman, who was formerly the co-founder of lingerie brand The Lake & Stars. “There’s a beautiful moment when someone realizes the work is actually candy and edible, and that’s magical; witnessing the delight is worth all the times I’ve burned my fingers in the kitchen.”

We took a mini Willy Wonka-type visit to the Sweet Saba candy factory—a studio space in Brooklyn—to see where the confectioner makes the magic happen. Of course, she had perfectly painted red nails with which to model her latest delights (she makes a special set of candies just to be photographed separately from the goods that go out to be eaten) in a shade that just so happens to be called Sweet Saba red—a color the nail brand Orly made just for Zilberman. See? Everyone wants a piece of her. Including us. Click through below to see some of her favorite creations and read how she came up with her genius brand.


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“I named the company for my Saba, which is Hebrew for 'grandfather.' He and I used to experiment with materials—anything from food ingredients to Krazy Glue to gunpowder and nail lacquers. My desire to create this business in his honor was not to mimic recipes we made in the kitchen, but to remind myself to always experiment and to try things out the ‘wrong’ way. Most people don’t know I have no culinary training.”
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