2018 wellness trends to leave behind

Wellness Trends to Leave Behind in 2018

There’s a lot we’d like to forget about this year.

By: Noah Lehava

2018 felt like a punch in the gut, in A LOT of ways, amirite? So don’t bring 2018’s issues with you into 2019. And that goes for some of the buzzy, fluffed-up and straight-up debunked wellness trends we got caught up in. Hey, we’re guilty of it too. So here’s to a fresh start in the new year. But first, it’s time to part ways with these.

 

Celery Juice

The wellness crowd has a fascination with green foods—avocado, smoothies...celery juice. But this latest trend of juicing stalks of celery and drinking it every morning has proven to be a bit more of a reach than the real deal. Promises of internal benefits include the power to starve viruses, improve mental acuity, and reduce inflammation and bloat, plus supposedly supreme hydration—the list really does go on. But there is little evidence to prove the aforementioned. You’re probably better offer snacking on a stalk and getting the benefits of the fiber than drinking the juice.

 

Crystal-Infused Everything

While we love the aesthetic of rose quartz and amethyst, we’ve reached peak crystal. Crystal water, crystal face mist, crystal yoni eggs. But other than good vibes and visual pleasure, it’s safe to say they weren’t miracle products.

 

Coconut Oil

We came, we saw, we added coconut oil to everything. Then, the American Heart Association changed things up and claimed that coconut oil was 100% saturated fat. Here’s the thing though: that doesn’t mean it’s bad for you, it just means it isn’t as good as you thought. So, don’t abandon it altogether because it still has some good stuff in it, but maybe leave the extra tablespoon scoop out of your smoothie.

 

Almond Milk

Non-dairy milk options are a big part of our diet. Soy led the charge before it was overtaken by almond. Now, though, a slew of nutrition-packed options have entered—pea, oat, flax, hemp—providing a variety of other avenues to consume our vitamins. What’s also threatening almond milk’s reign are misleading claims about the almond content, and the additives featured on the back-labels of store brands.

 

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